How 2 Entrepreneurs Are Helping Brands Make Millions

Throughout their 20-plus year careers as publicists and branding experts, Gwen Wunderlich and Dara Kaplan have launched hundreds of brands. Some from the ground up, some established and some they have completely reinvented. Founders of the Manhattan-based PR firm Wunderlich Kaplan Communications and creators of Pretty Electric, a hilarious new podcast on female entrepreneurship, business and beyond, they have mastered how to create that “it factor,” or as they say, “the electricity” needed to be successful in business and in life.

Source: How 2 Entrepreneurs Are Helping Brands Make Millions

5 Signals to Evaluate When Testing the Value of Your Brand

Here are five ways to improve it.

Brands are people first. Customers are people too, so customers tend to take their relationship with a brand personally. Therefore, it’s not a surprise that people praise their favorite smartphone brand, cringe over the thought of their cable company or even hate the mention of a particular bank.

Source: 5 Signals to Evaluate When Testing the Value of Your Brand – AlleyWatch

How to name your company

Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash

Don’t be literal. Think about feelings. Tag lines are useless. To create an effective brand in the startup age, you sometimes have to challenge established rules of corporate marketing. That was the key takeaway from a talk given by Emily Heyward and Jonah Fay-Hurvitz, two strategists at the Brooklyn-based agency Red Antler, at the 99U Conference last Thursday (May 10). Heyward and Fay-Hurvitz are worth listening to, given that Red Antler has become the branding guru du jour of the US startup scene, working with companies such as Casper, FourSquare, Rent the Runway, and Birchbox…

Source: How to name your company, according to Red Antler, the branding agency behind Casper, Allbirds, and Birchbox — Quartz at Work

Savvy Startups Are Investing in Brand Image First And You Should Too

Product used to be king, but in today’s fast-moving, copycat-filled world of business, a strong identity can be the key to success. Think about established brands like Nike, JetBlue and Apple. Yes, they all have great products. But their lasting success derives from their commitment to a corporate purpose that guides their market-­facing activities. From the outset, each of these companies clearly identified their target customers’ unmet needs, committed to a core idea that speaks to that need and made sure every single consumer touchpoint reinforced their brand promise. […]

Source: Savvy Startups Like Casper and Brandless Are Investing in Brand Image First — and You Should, Too

Sales vs. Branding

This one is really interesting and I have been thinking a lot about going deeper into the details to differentiate the articles I am sharing. I want to give you a piece that is going to be all about strategy and reveal some of the most important insights that I have about the difference between …

Source: Sales vs. Branding – AlleyWatch

Get To The Point! What Does Your Business Do?

To be successful, be succinct.

Another day, another pitch from an entrepreneur. The ones who go somewhere all have one thing in common: They get to the point.

If you can’t explain your business in a few minutes, then you’re probably going to struggle. The success hack that works is to get to the point! 

Source: Get To The Point! What Does Your Business Do?

[Infographic] The Do’s and Don’ts of Naming Your Business

Starting a new business is one of the most exciting moments in your career, let alone your life. There are a thousand details to address, so it’s important not to get carried away with your enthusiasm and overlook potential problems.

Source: [Infographic] The Do’s and Don’ts of Naming Your Business | SUCCESS

If You Want to Build a Billion-Dollar Brand Like Apple and Coca-Cola, Change Your Marketing Strategy

Five tips to know when it might be time to move beyond product and into brand advertising.

Apple didn’t become the most valuable brand in the entire world, worth $170 billion (total market cap: $814 billion), by talking about the processing power or pixel count of its computers. Instead, the company taps into a universal desire to express your individuality. Its ads have consistently reinforced that feeling, from “1984” to “Drake Vs. Bench Press.”

Source: If You Want to Build a Billion-Dollar Brand Like Apple and Coca-Cola, Change Your Marketing Strategy | Inc.com

Dig Deeper: The Secret To Gripping Brand Narratives

3 secret places.

Brand strategy is an excavation.

I’ve written in the past that “You dig and dig and dig until a market path is revealed.”

The perfect story, just like strategy, already exists. There is already a compelling, loyalty-building narrative hiding in the DNA of your brand. If you pull apart the floorboards and start shoveling at the dirt underneath, it will be there.

It’s your job to find it and bring it to life.

Source: Dig Deeper: The Secret To Gripping Brand Narratives

What Peter Thiel taught Stanford University students about startup success

Photo by Charles Koh on Unsplash

For a company to own its market, it must have some combination of brand, scale cost advantages, network effects, or proprietary technology. Of these elements, brand is probably the hardest to pin down. One way to think about brand is as a classic code word for monopoly.

But getting more specific than that is hard. Whatever a brand is, it means that people do not see products as interchangeable and are thus willing to pay more. Take Pepsi and Coke, for example. Most people have a fairly strong preference for one or the other. Both companies generate huge cash flows because consumers, it turns out, aren’t very indifferent at all. They buy into one of the two brands.

Source: What Peter Thiel taught Stanford University students about startup success